Category Archives: Thinkpad X1 Carbon

I know Apple, Apple is a friend of mine. Lenovo, you’re no Apple

Lenovo CEO Yang Yuanqing made an interest declaration the other day. He’s going to split their PC business into two units, one that does basic stuff aimed at consumers and businesses and another one that will get the Thinkpad brand and shoot for the higher end. The “Think” brand is needed to better compete with Apple, he said. As someone who recently switched to a Thinkpad after more than a decade on Apple laptops, all I can say is that Lenovo has a lot of work if it wants to even approach Apple’s customer service. Don’t get me wrong — I love the Thinkpad hardware. But almost everything dealing with Lenovo has been suboptimal.

The whole thing reminded me of that classic put down Senator Lloyd Bentsen delivered to Dan Quayle back in the 1988 campaign: Senator, I served with Jack Kennedy. I knew Jack Kennedy. Jack Kennedy was a friend of mine. Senator, you’re no Jack Kennedy.

It starts at the start. Go to Lenovo’s web site and try to order a customized Thinkpad.

For the X1 Carbon, there’s a laundry list of features on the customizing list – CPU, display, graphics system, memory and so on., Slowly click your way through the list — there’s a delay between every click. Click, sigh, click, sigh. But it’s all a trick. Almost nothing can be customized on the X1. Not the CPU, not the display or graphics system. But they’re still all on the list. On most models, you can’t even upgrade the RAM from 4 GB to 8 GB. Why? What the…

Oh well. So you finally order and your new laptop arrives. Time to boot it up. It’s not quite as speedy as you expected and when it’s done you can see why. Crapware is everywhere. There’s a ton of Lenovo nonsense — taking over simple functions like the wifi settings, the battery, it’s own software update app. Why do I need all this? Then there’s the actual crapware. Nitro Pro PDF, Norton VIP Access, SugarSync. There’s a cost to users from all this crapware. After the first week or two, my machine couldn’t load any Windows updates, not even critical security patches. The Lenovo support boards were filled with angry customers and no answers. Eventually, the answer turned out to be that the Nitro crapware program was interfering with Windows Update. A patch would be available soon. Hello, I have a quicker fix, Lenovo – don’t install crapware on my new computer.

I paid extra for the extended three-year warranty. I got an email with a spreadsheet attached, which I had to fill out with my serial number, model number and other gibberish and email back to Lenovo to activate my policy. Why? They have all this information — they just took my order and sent me the machine. Maybe they have outsourced the warranty to some third party but why is that my problem?

I ordered right before the Windows 8 roll out. I did it on purpose so I’d get a machine with Windows 7 in case there were big problems with the newer version. After a couple of weeks, I was ready to upgrade. Buried on Lenovo’s site was a 3-page list of instructions, including a list of programs I should uninstall before updating. I followed all the steps and held my breath. Almost everything worked fine but later, looking at the device manager in the control panel, I could see a few hardware driver problems. Resolving all the problems took multiple visits to the support web site, running the Lenovo update program over and over and some additional fishing around on Google for advice. Not smooth.

Apple, obviously, makes none of these mistakes. The ordering and customization process on the web is simple, quick and easy. First boot is clean and quick. There is no crapware to remove because there is no crapware. Small system updates arrive as needed and install. Information about your AppleCare warranty arrives in the mail. And when it’s time for a major OS update, it too arrives via the system updates and simply installs.

Lenovo has great hardware chops but if they want to take on Apple in the high-end computer market, they’ve got to make some serious improvements.

A longtime Mac user’s first impressions of the Thinkpad X1 Carbon

The Thinkpad X1 carbon

Well, as I’d been threatening for a while, I ended my decade plus using a Mac as my main computer this month and jumped to the Windows side, lured by the all-black, super-lightweight Lenovo Thinkpad X1 Carbon. I’ve had the laptop for about three weeks and here are some of my first impressions. Feel free to chime in with questions and comments in the comments, but please keep it polite and informative.

Fantastic hardware – I love the feel of the X1’s carbon fiber body, nicely grippable and an attractive matte black. It reminds me of my all-time favorite Mac laptop, the Powerbook G3 I had in the late 1990s, though it probably weighs less than half as much as that old battleship. The X1’s matte screen is also gorgeous, clear and bright at 14″ diagonally with 1600 by 900 pixels. The keyboard works great and the touchpad is also among the best — love the dedicated page up and down keys. There are other small, brilliant touches like a true security slot for your Kensington lock, a finger print reader and an SD card reader that inhales the whole card, so you don’t have anything sticking out if you want to leave a card in when you pack up (I can’t tell you how many times I closed my Macbook Pro, putting it to sleep, with an SD card sticking out so it would’t fit in my case and I had to wake it up and eject the card just to put it away).

In addition to my trusty 13″ MacBook Pro, I also used a Macbook Air as my main machine when I traveled in Europe this summer and, for comparison, I’d say the Thinkpad has a better screen and keyboard as well as superior battery life. I also much prefer the Thinkpad’s carbon body to the Air’s slippery, sharp aluminum shell. The Air’s trackpad was better and it had fewer of the Thinkpad’s software hiccups, some of which are detailed below.

Windows 8 is intriguing but with annoyances – I spend most of my time on the traditional desktop side running the same kinds of applications I used on my Mac. It’s not that different than prior versions of Windows. The desktop itself is still there as a much needed home base for short cuts and files. I definitely needed some small but critical tweaks. For example, the three click drop which unadulterated Windows 8 forces you into just to choose from among all your installed programs is annoying but easily remedied. I opted for the free Pokki Menu, which creates one button access to a highly customizable start menu with quick access also to shut down options and notifications. And I actually had to spend $15 on a file add-in just so Windows 8 could comprehend the RAW format files from my Sony camera.

Cross-platform software saves the day – I am so glad I went out of my way over the years to find software solutions that worked on multiple operating systems. By resisting Apple lock-in, I can safely say that all of my most important programs were cross-platform. Of course, cloud-based apps like Evernote, WordPress, Spotify and Dropbox work great on Windows. And Microsoft Office is at least as good in its native environs, though I wasn’t excited to buy it all over again. But most programs let me re-use my Mac license for the Windows version, like Adobe Lightroom and Postbox for email. To fill in some small gaps, I’ve been trying out new Windows stuff, like lean, mean text editor Markdown Pad. I also like Azotix Software’s Active Organizer program, a dedicated, stand alone Google contacts and calendar program that works even when you’re offline.

Lenovo! Newman! – I must admit that every time I have to deal with Lenovo, I long for Apple. The online purchasing experience was awful — clunky, buggy and with too few options available. You want an Intel i7 processor and more than 4 GB of RAM? No luck, i5 for you. SSD bigger than 256 GB? Not available. The support site is even worse. Could it at least remember which model I have so I don’t have go through the eight-step selection process all over again every time I visit? And then there’s the god awful pile of crapware, sort-of-helpware and failware that comes pre-installed. So far, every fourth upgrade attempt utterly fails. Blech. I’ll blog later about the process of upgrading the brand new machine from Windows 7 to 8, but suffice it to say that it required following a 4-page, single space typed set of instructions from Lenovo that asked me to manually uninstall a half dozen programs and failed to explain that some needed driver software had to be downloaded separately.

Still keeping up with Mac world – I’m still using Macs and iPads around the house to remain bilingual and retain my ability to complain about the many flaws creeping into Mac OS X. Mountain Lion is just awful for me, from the insane iCloud file scheme to the anorexically thin scroll bars to the finder which needs an complete overhaul that’s about 8 years overdue. But OS X has other strengths and there’s lots of interesting Mac software, so I’ll try to keep up.

(Edited to add a few more examples for clarity. Also see my responses in the comments.)